'Only the moon's smile can cure the unseen scars of darkness'
- Munia Khan

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Ascending. Courtesy by Richard Tuschman ( Klompching Gallery)

Ascending. Courtesy by Richard Tuschman (Klompching Gallery)

Series Pilot - 50 min (ready for development)

The Necronomion, Lovecraft's Book of the Dead

The Necronomion, Lovecraft's Book of the Dead

Based on H.P. Lovecraft’s novella

The Tomb (1917)

Jervas is an odd ten year-old boy. Many years ago, there was a particular house in his neighbourhood that went up in flames, killing the last surviving members of the Hyde family. All of them were entombed in a private crypt built into the recesses of a hillside.  Having grown up in the area and having heard many stories about this family’s untimely demise, young Jervas develops a perhaps unhealthy fascination with the crypt, and longs to visit the inside. But the door is solid and sealed tight with a plethora of chains and padlocks. For quite some time, he is content to lay at its entrance and daydream...until the day he finds the key.

Le bal-masqué à l'Opéra by  Hermans

Le bal-masqué à l'Opéra by Hermans

Peder Balke, Fra Nordkapp, 1840

 
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Edward Hopper, Lighthouse Hill

Edward Hopper, Lighthouse Hill

"It’s not the towering sail, but the unseen wind that moves the ship."

Unknown

Montague Dawson (1895-1973), The Crescent Moon

Montague Dawson (1895-1973), The Crescent Moon

FEATURE FILM - 120 min (ongoing writing)

In a small village of Cornwall, by the sea, where the legends come from, people start to mysteriously go missing. A diving crew, on a mission to find an ancient artifact, is eyed up by the town folks who aren't used to strangers. The crew soon realises that this town is not like any others... Strange weeping sounds coming from the sea shore can be heard at night and it's said to be dangerous to go at sea. Of course, the crew doesn't believe in local folk tales…

Victor Karlovich Shtemberg (1863-1921), Sirens by the sea

Victor Karlovich Shtemberg (1863-1921), Sirens by the sea

Frederick Judd Waugh (1861-1940), Moonlight 

Frederick Judd Waugh (1861-1940), Moonlight 

“Faced with the inexplicable, we won’t get far by responding with the kind of superstitious ignorance displayed by the (…) villagers. Today the fashion among scientists and their advocates is to demand evidence-based reasoning for everything. But in the late nineteenth century scientists were happy to admit that the data itself is not always adequate for reaching definite conclusions, and that to reason beyond them one might need to add another ingredient: imagination.

It is via the imaginative leap, argued John Tyndall in his essay Scientific Use of the Imagination (1870) that “we can lighten the darkness which surrounds the world of our senses.””

Philip Ball, The History of the Unseen, 2014, p.182

 

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